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Oxford Jewish Thought

Lectures, essays, questions & articles

by Rabbi Eli Brackman

Vegetarianism & Jewish philosophy

Vegetarianism & Jewish philosophy

 

By Rabbi Eli Brackman 

 

Vegetarianism is said to be the fastest growing trend in the developed world. It refers to the voluntary practice of following plant-based diets, with or without the inclusion of dairy products or eggs, and with the exclusion of meat. It can be dated in Europe back to the time of Pythagoras 6th century BCE but was to reemerge somewhat in Europe during the Renaissance and became a more widespread practice in the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

Does Judaism agree with or acknowledge this ideal of abstaining from eating meat as a way of life? This essay will discuss a Jewish view of vegetarianism, its philosophy and the intriguing compatibility of the age… Read More »

A dispute about a hilltop between the King James Bible and some rabbis

A dispute about a hilltop between the King James Bible and some rabbis

By Rabbi Eli Brackman 

An interesting study in the King James Bible is to compare a translation in 1611 in the King James Bible with a classic translation of the Torah by the rabbis centuries earlier.

 

This analysis will give insight into where the King James Bible possibly derived its sources from or at least what they are similar to. As the King James Bible is eighty percent William Tyndale’s translation, it will also give insight as to whose Hebrew commentary Tyndale benefited from, directly or indirectly, when translating the Hebrew Bible in the beginning of the 16th century before he was burned due to blasphemy in 1513.

 

For this… Read More »

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